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Analysing two potential outlets of a shrinking Pacific mantle reservoir: The Scotia Sea and the Caribbean

Nerlich, Rainer (2014), Analysing two potential outlets of a shrinking Pacific mantle reservoir: The Scotia Sea and the Caribbean, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München.

Abstract
This thesis deals with new plate reconstruction models of the Scotia Sea and the Caribbean - regions that share very complicated plate tectonic histories. Each model and their implications are discussed, e.g. it is shown that the Central Scotia Sea is most likely not a Mesozoic plate fragment as suggested by some authors. On the other hand, the presented reconstruction model of the Caribbean confirms the link between the Caribbean Plateau and the Galápagos hotspot, i.e. that the rising plume head of the paleo-Galápagos hotspot was the source of the rocks that compose the present-day Caribbean Plateau. This is consistent with abundant geochemical evidence but contrary to previous reconstruction models in an Indo-Atlantic hotspot reference frame. It is outlined in detail, which assumptions are necessary to establish this link.
The reconstruction models were further employed to derive regional age-grids. These in turn were used to calculate the present-day residual/dynamic topography of each region to test the hypothesis, whether the Scotia Sea and the Caribbean are asthenosphere outlets of a shrinking Pacific into a growing Atlantic mantle reservoir. The underlying idea is that due to the shrinkage of the Pacific a pressure gradient drives the asthenosphere through the proposed outlets, such that global mass balance can be achieved by lateral shallow mantle flow alone. If true, these regions should be characterized by a gradual decrease in dynamic topography from west to east. It is shown that the Scotia Sea does not serve as the suggested outlet, while some mantle inflow in the Caribbean realm occurs. However, because the amount of shallow mantle flow from the Pacific into the Atlantic realm seems to be rather small, it is concluded that deep mantle processes underneath Africa are the far more relevant source to achieve global mass balance.
BibTeX
@phdthesis{id1956,
  author = {Rainer Nerlich},
  note = {in press},
  school = {Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit{\"a}t M{\"u}nchen},
  title = {{Analysing two potential outlets of a shrinking Pacific mantle reservoir: The Scotia Sea and the Caribbean}},
  year = {2014},
}
EndNote
%0 Thesis
%A Nerlich, Rainer
%D 2014
%T Analysing two potential outlets of a shrinking Pacific mantle reservoir: The Scotia Sea and the Caribbean
%I Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
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Printed 26. Jan 2020 11:59